Courses

Courses

Courses

Courses

Bible Department
Department of Applied Christianity
Department of English and Speech
Department of Missions
Bible Department

R-Pentateuch—BI-11

An overview of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy with emphasis on the historicity, importance, and basic message of each book; the scriptural proof of authorship; and the way it points to the central theme of the Bible:  Christ.

(one semester—three hours)

R-Historical Books—BI-12

The history of the nation of Israel is traced from their first entrance into the promised land through the periods of prosperity, apostasy, captivity, and return to the land.  The course identifies the message and lessons of each book from Joshua through Esther.

(one semester—three hours)

R-Poetical Books—BI-13

A survey of the following Old Testament books:  Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Solomon.

(one semester—two hours)

R-Major Prophets—BI-14

A survey of the books of Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, and Ezekiel.

(one semester—two hours)

R-The Gospel of John—BI-16

A serious, reflective study of the book whose writer’s purpose is “...that ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing ye might have life through his name” (John 20:31).

(one semester—two hours)

E-Acts—BI-17

This course is a chapter-by chapter study with emphasis on practical application.  It includes a discussion of the authorship, date of writing, design, and purpose.

(one semester—three hours)

R-New Testament Survey I, II—BI-21-22

A bird’s eye view of each book of the New Testament including the four-fold view of Christ, the acts of the apostles through the Holy Spirit, the church and general epistles, and the final prophecy of God’s complete revelation to man.  This course requires the student to read the entire New Testament.

(two semesters, three hours each)

R-Bible Doctrines I, II—BI 23, 24

This course examines the cardinal doctrines of the Bible, which will be covered in the following order.  The first semester consists of the study of the doctrine of the Bible, the doctrine of God, the doctrine of Christ, the doctrine of the Holy Spirit, the doctrine of Angels, and the doctrine of Satan.  The second semester consists of the doctrine of Man, the doctrine of Sin, the doctrine of Salvation, the doctrine of the Church, and the doctrine of Last Things.

(two semesters—three hours each)

R-Minor Prophets—BI 25

A survey of the prophetic writings of the Old Testament from Hosea to Malachi.

(one semester—two hours)

E-I & II Corinthians—BI-27

A careful study of the Corinthian Epistles, with special emphasis on problems in the local church and questions of daily Christian conduct.  (Prerequisite:  New Testament Survey I, II).

(one semester—three hours)

E-Colossians and Philippians—BI-29

A verse-by-verse exegetical study of these two epistles.  The study includes a discussion of authorship, purpose, place of writing, and date of writing.  It will give the student a working knowledge of truth he can use in teaching, preaching, and witnessing.  The course is characterized by both biblical interpretation and practical application.

(one semester—two hours)

E-I & II Thessalonians—BI-30

A verse-by-verse, exegetical study of the Thessalonian epistles.  The study includes a discussion of authorship, purpose, place and date of writing.  This study will acquaint the student with the reality of practical Christian living in light of the second coming of Christ!  It will also give a working knowledge of truth for witnessing and teaching and preaching these truths.  The course is characterized by both biblical interpretation and practical application.

(one semester—two hours)

R-Christian Evidences (Apologetics)—BI 31

This course is designed to equip students to “...be ready always to give an answer to every man that asketh you a reason of the hope that is in you...” (I Peter 3:15).  It is a positive presentation of the evidences for the Christian faith giving attention to verification from the nature of Scripture, fulfilled prophecy, miracles, the character of Christ, the resurrection of Christ, science, history, and personal experience.  Special emphasis is given to the reliability of the first 11 chapters of Genesis, since the rest of the Bible rises or falls on those teachings.  Major arguments opposing Christianity are considered and refuted.

(one semester—three hours)

R-Hermeneutics—BI 32

A study of the methods and principles of biblical interpretation giving particular attention to the nature and structure of Scripture, the unfolding character of revelation, prophecy, typology, symbolism, and parables.  Difficult passages and problem areas in interpretation are considered and explained.

(one semester—three hours)

E-The Epistle to the Hebrews—BI-33

A verse-by-verse study of this epistle including a discussion of authorship, purpose, place of writing, date written, and persons to whom it was written.  Prerequisite:  New Testament Survey I, II.

(one semester—three hours)

R-The Epistle to the Romans—BI-34

A verse-by-verse study of this epistle including a discussion of authorship, purpose, place of writing, date written, and persons to whom it was written.  Prerequisite:  New Testament Survey I, II.

(one semester—three hours)

E-Pastoral Epistles—BI-35

This course is especially designed for ministers of the Gospel and includes a detailed study of the books of I and II Timothy and Titus with emphasis upon applications to the present-day ministers of the Word.

(one semester—two hours)

E-Galatians & Ephesians—BI-37

A verse-by-verse study of these epistles including a discussion of authorship, purpose, place of writing, date written, and persons to whom it was written.

(one semester—two hours)

E-Epistles of Peter—BI-38

A verse-by-verse study of I and Second Peter, with a view of acquainting the student with all the facts relative to these two books.  It will give the student a working knowledge of truth he can use in his teaching and preaching.

(one semester—two hours)

R-The Books of Daniel and Revelation—BI-41

An analysis and comparison of the prophetic books of Daniel in the Old Testament and Revelation in the New Testament.

(one semester—three hours)

R-Biblical Research—BI-46

This course is intended to be taken in conjunction with English III A and consists of guided research within certain parameters in a field or on a topic of the student’s choice.  The student will work with his faculty advisor to produce a paper, a monograph, a small thesis, a book study, or extended sermon outlines.  This is a practical course which will prepare the student for individual research after graduation.

(one semester—one hour)

E-World Religions—BI-51

A study of the major world religious systems and their most significant doctrinal teachings.  The course will primarily focus on Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Judaism, and sub-groups associated with Christianity including Roman Catholicism, Liberalism, Neo-Orthodoxy, Orthodoxy, and Radical Theology.  Of these sub-groups, special attention will be given to Fundamentalism and Neo-Orthodoxy.

(one semester—two hours)

R-Bible Translations—BI-52

This course presents a brief history of the English translations of the Bible.  A comparison is made between the Textus Receptus and the so-called critical text of the New Testament.  The relative merits and demerits of modern translations are discussed.  Intended as a second-year course; Prerequisite:  Bible Doctrines I & II.

(one semester—one hour)

Department of Applied Christianity

R-Evangelism—AC-I

This is a study of both the methods and message in winning men to Christ and building up churches, equipping the student to deal individually with the ignorant, the unconcerned, procrastinators, those led away by false cults, or those with difficulties concerning their personal salvation.

(one semester—two hours)

R-Orientation—AC-2

A class required of all first-year students which emphasizes various aspects of life at “Faith:”  resources available to our students, study habits, work ethics and Christian testimony, grading system, rules, financial suggestions, personal family considerations, enduring hardness, and evaluating and responding to new material.

(one semester—one hour)

R-Homiletics—AC-3

Homiletics is the science of preparation and delivery of sermons.  The preacher’s call, qualifications, perils, etc., are also studied.

(one semester—two hours)

E-Etiquette—AC-5

“The right thing to do at the right time” includes letter writing, etiquette in the home (as guest or host), in public, and in church.  Emphasis is given to development of personality, dating, courtship, engagement, marriage, and practical suggestions for happiness in the home.  (Intended for third year)

(one semester—two hours)

R-Bible Geography and Customs—AC-6

The student is given a basic knowledge of the customs of the people along with the geography of the lands associated with the writing of the Bible, as they relate to and illustrate the Scriptures.

(one semester—two hours)

R-The Cults I, II—AC-11, 12

This is a course in polemics and includes a consideration of the various cults and anti-Christian movements in the light of Biblical teaching.  Since Jesus also died for those trapped in these erroneous systems, consideration is given not just to protection from their false doctrines but also  to winning these individuals to Christ.

(two semesters—two hours each)

R-Pastoral Theology—AC-17

This class is intended for those who expect to become pastors or assistant pastors.  The course outlines the duties and problems of the pastoral office and gives practical assistance to anyone who is called to serve in any pastoral relationship.

(one semester—two hours)

E-The Christian Home—AC-22

As II Timothy 3:16-17 indicates, the Bible provides a thorough education in these most important aspects of life:  courtship, marriage, and sex.  With the Bible as the primary text, students will be guided in consulting and comparing the works of various authors, both Christian and secular.

(one semester—two hours)

R-Church History I, II—AC-27, 28

First semester is a study of early, medieval and Reformation church history through 1648, giving special attention to the rise and development of Catholicism and the various phases of the Reformation.  Second semester is a study of church history from 1648 to the present, noting particularly the rise of denominationalism, revival and missionary movements, liberalism, neo-orthodoxy, neo-evangelicalism, and the “emerging” church.

(two semesters—two hours each)

E-Christian Citizenship—AC-29

It is true that neither Jesus Christ nor the apostles spent much effort trying to change or impact the civil government of the first century.  However, unlike citizens of this country, they did not live under a participatory form of government.  This course examines our nation’s founding documents and the creeds and philosophies of the founding fathers of our country and establishes biblical guiding principles for the Christian as a participating citizen of the United States of America.

(one semester—two hours)

E-Fundamentals of Broadcasting—AC-32

This course is designed to give students a foundational understanding of the fundamentals of broadcasting in four key areas:  Production, Engineering, News, and Sponsorships.

(one semester—two hours)

R-Church Polity—AC-37

I Corinthians 14:40 says to “let all things be done decently and in order.”  Accordingly, this course is a study in the organization and administration of the local church according to the New Testament.  Included is a brief discussion of parliamentary law procedures.

(one semester—two hours)

R-Ministry Practicum—AC-48—53

This required course engages students in active practical ministry application of the scriptural truths learned in the classroom, especially Evangelism—AC-1.  Under the direction and guidance of the teacher, students will become regularly and faithfully involved at least one hour per week in ministry to the nursing home, jail, bus, Sunday school, hospital, home visitation, or other ministries.

(six semesters—one hour each)

Department of English and Speech

R-English I, A. B.—ES-11, 12

This is a course in very basic English grammar:  introducing / reviewing such fundamental concepts as parts of speech, clauses and phrases, subject / verb agreement, pronoun / antecedent agreement, pronoun case, the various types of sentences, and rules of punctuation.  All incoming students will take an English placement (diagnostic) test.  Scoring sufficiently well on the test will enable a student to “opt out” of this first of what is otherwise three required years of English.

(two semesters—three hours each)

R-English II, A. B.—ES-21, 22

This course reviews principles of English I, A. B. and begins expanded application in such forms as paragraph and letter writing.

(two semesters—three hours each)

R-English  III, A. B.—ES- 31, 32

This course will allow the student to demonstrate mastery of the fundamentals of English grammar.  Students will go on to learn and use these fundamentals in new applications  such as correct essay form.  The student will gain proficiency writing on several topics:  some that are directed as well as some of his or her own choice.  Finally, the student will produce written assignments for other classes (e.g. Biblical Research—BI-46) that will have both a content grade for the other class as well as a grammar / composition grade for its grammatical correctness.

(two semesters—three hours each)

E-Fundamentals of Speech—ES-23

A general course in the fundamentals of speech, dealing with the important factors involved in speaking correctly and appropriately before an audience.

(one semester—two hours)

Department of Missions

(subject to later expansion)

R-Biblical Missions—MI-12

A course designed to present the biblical basis of missions and emphasizing the truth that missions is one of the cardinal doctrines of both the Old and New Testaments.  The missionary’s call and qualifications are also studied.

(one semester—two hours)