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Courses

Courses

Courses

Courses

Bible Department

R-Pentateuch—BI-11

An overview of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy with emphasis on the historicity, importance, and basic message of each book; the scriptural proof of authorship; and the way it points to the central theme of the Bible:  Christ.

(one semester—three hours)

R-Historical Books—BI-12

The history of the nation of Israel is traced from their first entrance into the promised land through the periods of prosperity, apostasy, captivity, and return to the land.  The course identifies the message and lessons of each book from Joshua through Esther.

(one semester—three hours)

R-Poetical Books—BI-13

A survey of the following Old Testament books:  Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Solomon.

(one semester—two hours)

R-Major Prophets—BI-14

A survey of the books of Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, and Ezekiel.

(one semester—two hours)

R-The Gospel of John—BI-16

A serious, reflective study of the book whose writer’s purpose is “...that ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing ye might have life through his name” (John 20:31).

(one semester—two hours)

E-Acts—BI-17

This course is a chapter-by chapter study with emphasis on practical application.  It includes a discussion of the authorship, date of writing, design, and purpose.

(one semester—three hours)

R-New Testament Survey I, II—BI-21-22

A bird’s eye view of each book of the New Testament including the four-fold view of Christ, the acts of the apostles through the Holy Spirit, the church and general epistles, and the final prophecy of God’s complete revelation to man.  This course requires the student to read the entire New Testament.

(two semesters, three hours each)

R-Bible Doctrines I, II—BI 23, 24

This course examines the cardinal doctrines of the Bible, which will be covered in the following order.  The first semester consists of the study of the doctrine of the Bible, the doctrine of God, the doctrine of Christ, the doctrine of the Holy Spirit, the doctrine of Angels, and the doctrine of Satan.  The second semester consists of the doctrine of Man, the doctrine of Sin, the doctrine of Salvation, the doctrine of the Church, and the doctrine of Last Things.

(two semesters—three hours each)

R-Minor Prophets—BI 25

A survey of the prophetic writings of the Old Testament from Hosea to Malachi.

(one semester—two hours)

E-I & II Corinthians—BI-27

A careful study of the Corinthian Epistles, with special emphasis on problems in the local church and questions of daily Christian conduct.  (Prerequisite:  New Testament Survey I, II).

(one semester—three hours)

E-Colossians and Philippians—BI-29

A verse-by-verse exegetical study of these two epistles.  The study includes a discussion of authorship, purpose, place of writing, and date of writing.  It will give the student a working knowledge of truth he can use in teaching, preaching, and witnessing.  The course is characterized by both biblical interpretation and practical application.

(one semester—two hours)

E-I & II Thessalonians—BI-30

A verse-by-verse, exegetical study of the Thessalonian epistles.  The study includes a discussion of authorship, purpose, place and date of writing.  This study will acquaint the student with the reality of practical Christian living in light of the second coming of Christ!  It will also give a working knowledge of truth for witnessing and teaching and preaching these truths.  The course is characterized by both biblical interpretation and practical application.

(one semester—two hours)

R-Christian Evidences (Apologetics)—BI 31

This course is designed to equip students to “...be ready always to give an answer to every man that asketh you a reason of the hope that is in you...” (I Peter 3:15).  It is a positive presentation of the evidences for the Christian faith giving attention to verification from the nature of Scripture, fulfilled prophecy, miracles, the character of Christ, the resurrection of Christ, science, history, and personal experience.  Special emphasis is given to the reliability of the first 11 chapters of Genesis, since the rest of the Bible rises or falls on those teachings.  Major arguments opposing Christianity are considered and refuted.

(one semester—three hours)

R-Hermeneutics—BI 32

A study of the methods and principles of biblical interpretation giving particular attention to the nature and structure of Scripture, the unfolding character of revelation, prophecy, typology, symbolism, and parables.  Difficult passages and problem areas in interpretation are considered and explained.

(one semester—three hours)

E-The Epistle to the Hebrews—BI-33

A verse-by-verse study of this epistle including a discussion of authorship, purpose, place of writing, date written, and persons to whom it was written.  Prerequisite:  New Testament Survey I, II.

(one semester—three hours)

R-The Epistle to the Romans—BI-34

A verse-by-verse study of this epistle including a discussion of authorship, purpose, place of writing, date written, and persons to whom it was written.  Prerequisite:  New Testament Survey I, II.

(one semester—three hours)

E-Pastoral Epistles—BI-35

This course is especially designed for ministers of the Gospel and includes a detailed study of the books of I and II Timothy and Titus with emphasis upon applications to the present-day ministers of the Word.

(one semester—two hours)

E-Galatians & Ephesians—BI-37

A verse-by-verse study of these epistles including a discussion of authorship, purpose, place of writing, date written, and persons to whom it was written.

(one semester—two hours)

E-Epistles of Peter—BI-38

A verse-by-verse study of I and Second Peter, with a view of acquainting the student with all the facts relative to these two books.  It will give the student a working knowledge of truth he can use in his teaching and preaching.

(one semester—two hours)

R-The Books of Daniel and Revelation—BI-41

An analysis and comparison of the prophetic books of Daniel in the Old Testament and Revelation in the New Testament.

(one semester—three hours)

R-Biblical Research—BI-46

This course is intended to be taken in conjunction with English III A and consists of guided research within certain parameters in a field or on a topic of the student’s choice.  The student will work with his faculty advisor to produce a paper, a monograph, a small thesis, a book study, or extended sermon outlines.  This is a practical course which will prepare the student for individual research after graduation.

(one semester—one hour)

E-World Religions—BI-51

A study of the major world religious systems and their most significant doctrinal teachings.  The course will primarily focus on Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Judaism, and sub-groups associated with Christianity including Roman Catholicism, Liberalism, Neo-Orthodoxy, Orthodoxy, and Radical Theology.  Of these sub-groups, special attention will be given to Fundamentalism and Neo-Orthodoxy.

(one semester—two hours)

R-Bible Translations—BI-52

This course presents a brief history of the English translations of the Bible.  A comparison is made between the Textus Receptus and the so-called critical text of the New Testament.  The relative merits and demerits of modern translations are discussed.  Intended as a second-year course; Prerequisite:  Bible Doctrines I & II.

(one semester—one hour)

Department of Applied Christianity
Department of English and Speech
Department of Missions